Journal Articles & Research

Below are links for downloading journal articles and papers published by AdvaGenix of possible interest to reproductive endocrinologists, scientists and health care providers in various reproductive medicine specialties.


  • “Embryonal mitochondrial DNA: relationship to embryo quality and transfer outcomes”

    Journal of Assisted Reproductive Genetics

    May 2018, Volume 35, Issue 5, Pages 871–877

    Study the association between embryonal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and embryo quality and implantation outcomes.


  • "Review and recap of the Midwest Reproductive Symposium International: learning tool for continuing medical education for reproductive endocrinologists, geneticists, embryologists, mental health, and other infertility providers"

    Journal of Assisted Reproductive Genetics

    November 2018, Volume 35, Issue 11, Pages 2083–2085

    Conferences serve an essential means of learning and staying up to date in all aspects of medicine. Reproductive endocrinology
    and infertility is a young and constantly evolving field. The Midwest Reproductive Symposium International (MRSi) is a yearly
    conference held in Chicago, IL, and is one of the most intimate yet influential conferences in the fertility world. This conference is
    geared towards all professions and roles in the fertility world such as physicians, geneticists, nurses, allied health professionals,
    basic scientists, mental health professionals, business administration professionals, reproductive endocrinology and infertility
    fellows, and obstetrics and gynecology residents alike. The goal of MRSi is to continue to understand this revolutionary field in
    order to improve patient outcomes while staying up to date with the latest technology.


  • “Essential learning tools for continuing medical education for physicians, geneticists, nurses, allied health professionals, mental health professionals, business administration professionals, and reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) fellows: the Midwest Reproductive Symposium International”

    Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics

    April 2018, Volume 35, Issue 4, Pages 547–549

    Essential learning tools for continuing medical education are a challenge in today’s rapidly evolving field of reproductive medicine. The Midwest Reproductive Symposium International (MRSi) is a yearly conference held in Chicago, IL. The conference is targeted toward physicians, geneticists, nurses, allied health professionals, mental health professionals, business administration professionals, and reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) fellows engaged in the practice of reproductive medicine. In addition to the scientific conference agenda, there are specific sessions for nurses, mental health professionals, and REI fellows. Unique to the MRSi conference, there is also a separate “Business Minds” session to provide education on business acumen as it is an important element to running a department, division, or private clinic.


  • "Reproductive ovarian testing and the alphabet soup of diagnoses: DOR, POI, POF, POR, and FOR"

    Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics

    January 2018, Volume 35, Issue 1, Pages 17–23

    There are large variations in the number of oocytes within each woman, and biologically, the total quantity is at its maximum before the woman is born. Scientific knowledge is limited about factors controlling the oocyte pool and how to measure it. Within fertility clinics, there is no uniform agreement on the diagnostic criteria for each common measure of ovarian reserve in women, and thus, studies often conflict. While declining oocyte quantity/quality is a normal physiologic occurrence as women age, some women experience diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) much earlier than usual and become prematurely infertile. Key clinical features of DOR are the presence of regular menstrual periods and abnormal-but-not-postmenopausal ovarian reserve test results. A common clinical challenge is counseling patients with conflicting ovarian reserve test results. The clinical diagnosis of DOR and the interpretation of ovarian reserve testing are complicated by changing lab testing options and processing for anti-mullerian hormone since 2010. Further, complicating the diagnostic and research scenario is the existence of other distinct yet related clinical terms, specifically premature ovarian failure, primary ovarian insufficiency, poor ovarian response, and functional ovarian reserve. The similarities and differences between the definitions of DOR with each of these four terms are reviewed. We recommend greater medical community involvement in terminology decisions, and the addition of DOR-specific medical subject-heading search terms.